Reading List: NSA Reform, Activists, and Cars that Watch You

Happy Monday! Here’s a good mix of articles on everything from social media creditworthiness, cars that watch you, NSA reform, and an untold story of an FBI burglary. We also hope you enjoy Michael Toy’s take on Present Shock and Paul. If you want a brief overview of Rushkoff’s Present Shock, watch this.

resist so life may exist

Trial of anti-nuclear activists ends with unusual sentence – National Catholic Reporter

“Defense attorney Henry Stoever meekly approached the bench of Presiding Judge Ardie Bland Dec. 13, complaining that security had refused to let him bring certain pieces of evidence into the courthouse: a full-sized wooden door with a banner proclaiming, “Open the door to a nuclear weapons free world!”, as well as an array of picket signs.”

Borrowers Hit Social-Media Hurdles – Wall Street Journal

“More lending companies are mining Facebook, Twitter and other social-media data to help determine a borrower’s creditworthiness or identity, a trend that is raising concerns among consumer groups and regulators.”

Obama to unveil NSA reforms on Jan. 17 – The Hill

“Obama has spent recent weeks reviewing a series of 46 recommendations made by a White House review panel, which has called for additional transparency and privacy protections to be added to the controversial NSA surveillance programs.”

Ford’s Farley backs down: ‘We do not track our customers in their cars’ – Automotive News

“During a panel discussion about data privacy at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Farley tried to describe how much data Ford was able to collect on its customers and how its uses the data to avoid privacy issues. “We know everyone who breaks the law, we know when you’re doing it. We have GPS in your car, so we know what you’re doing. By the way, we don’t supply that data to anyone,” he told attendees.”

Burglars Who Took On F.B.I. Abandon Shadows – New York Times

“The perfect crime is far easier to pull off when nobody is watching.

“So on a night nearly 43 years ago, while Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier bludgeoned each other over 15 rounds in a televised title bout viewed by millions around the world, burglars took a lock pick and a crowbar and broke into a Federal Bureau of Investigation office in a suburb of Philadelphia, making off with nearly every document inside.”

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About the Contributor

Benjamin Robertson

Benjamin Robertson
Benjamin Robertson is a founding editor at Second Nature. He has worked in advertising for the Chicago Tribune and Gannett, and now is a web developer at Mediacurrent. He studied Communications and Media Studies under Dr. Read Schuchardt at Wheaton College in Illinois. He has presented papers on Marshall McLuhan, media ecology, and Christianity at the Media Ecology Association, National Communication Association, and the McLuhan's Philosophy of Media Centennial Conference in Brussels. He lives with his wife, Ruth, in Greenville, SC. His personal website is benrobertson.io

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